Chain of Fire (Journey to JoBurg Series Book 2)

Journey to Jo'burg has ratings and reviews. I give this book 2 stars because I don't think the author described racism clearly and this book is not a.
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Preview — Journey to Jo'burg by Beverley Naidoo. A South African Story 3. If only Mma was here, Naledi wished over and over. Mma lives and works in Johannesburg, far from the village thirteen-year-old Naledi and her younger brother, Tiro, call home. When their baby sister suddenly becomes very sick, Naledi and Tiro know, deep down, that only one person can save her. Bravely, alone, they set off on a journey to find Mma and bring her back. It If only Mma was here, Naledi wished over and over. It isn't until they reach the city that they come to understand the dangers of their country, and the painful struggle for freedom and dignity that is taking place all around them.

Paperback , 96 pages. Published December 24th by HarperCollins first published January 1st To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about Journey to Jo'burg , please sign up. Short summary of journey to Jo'burg from chapter 9 to 15? See all 3 questions about Journey to Jo'burg….

Lists with This Book. Nov 20, Will rated it really liked it. This story is about two children who live in a poor village in South Africa. Their mother works far away in Johannesburg and their father died from a disease caught in the mines. Their little sister is desperately ill and the two children decide to walk to the city to bring their mother home.

The story tells of their awakening to the situation in their country of the appalling treatment of blacks by the rich white people. The children finally find their mother, but their troubles are not yet ove This story is about two children who live in a poor village in South Africa. The children finally find their mother, but their troubles are not yet over. Things are not as simple as they thought they would be.

Beverley Naidoo

They have to stay with their new friend for the night, then travel back with their mother the next day. They experience a tense few days while Dineo is in hospital. This is a book from the SFA scheme of work. It has a Reading Focus; to investigate what makes a reader want to read on after the first page. And a Writing Focus; to add a new scene to the story. I read this to a year 6 class and they really enjoyed it, interested in exploring the history and learning about the issues that faced South Africa. I found this book humbling and heartwarming. It is written from the viewpoint of two young children in South Africa who struggle to understand the injustice they and their families face.

When their baby sister falls gravely ill they courageously decide to travel km from their small village to Johannesburg to summon their mother from work. The physical journey is symbolic of their awakening to the wider realities of apartheid; they face danger and experience prejudice, but also meet kind stran I found this book humbling and heartwarming. The physical journey is symbolic of their awakening to the wider realities of apartheid; they face danger and experience prejudice, but also meet kind strangers who help to keep them safe and tell them stories about the uprising of students in Soweto.

Michael Rosen's introduction to this recent edition provides an insight into the global political context at the time of its release in He celebrates Journey to Jo'burg for being the first childrens' book about the lives of black African during apartheid. At the time it was considered so 'dangerous' that it was banned in South Africa. At the back there is a copy of a letter banning the book's import, which gives greater impact to comprehending the extent of governmental corruption.

This is a universal story of hope and determination amidst great opression. I think it would be suitable for upper KS2 and has many cross-curricular learning possibilities. If you have read The Help, this is an equivalent book for children. The period is South Africa's apartheid years, and while I'm rating four for writing, I'm rating another star for the depiction of tendencies towards popular activism and bringing about change. I also like that there is a simple map. Two kids see their little sister getting very ill but the lady who cares for them doesn't have money for a hospital.

So the pair bravely decide to walk to their mother who works as a housekeeper and If you have read The Help, this is an equivalent book for children. So the pair bravely decide to walk to their mother who works as a housekeeper and nanny in the big city, Johannesburg. On the way they learn that the white rulers have decided to pass laws that children can't live with their parents who work in cities; that workers must carry a pass; that children are kept from school to pick oranges, and not allowed to eat the fruit; that black children are taught rubbish in school, such as how to write letters seeking employment as servants.

They have to board a different bus to whites, use a different hospital and more. The main worry of course, is whether they can find their mother; after that, can they save their sister? The author was a white girl who knew she would have suffered under Nazi Germany, but just did not realise how her black servants had to live. Once she did realise she wrote this book to show the world and promote change from youth upwards. While now dated it's worth a read and worth giving to a child.

Be prepared for some long conversations, so parents might want to do some background reading too. The tale is simply told and should suit anyone aged from nine or ten. I really enjoyed reading this moving story by Beverley Naidoo. Set against the dangerous landscape of Apartheid South Africa, Journey to Jo'burg is an inspiring story of two young courageous children, a brother and sister called Naledi and Tiro. The story follows their journey from their small village in South Africa to Jo'burg, about miles away, in search of their mother.

Their younger sister, Dineo, is very ill and Naledi decides that they need to travel to Jo'burg to bring their mother ba I really enjoyed reading this moving story by Beverley Naidoo. Their younger sister, Dineo, is very ill and Naledi decides that they need to travel to Jo'burg to bring their mother back home in order to save their sister.

The story highlights the dangers and adventures the children encounter along the way and the challenges they face in South Africa at the time. As well as clear character descriptions and vivid imagery, there are many themes running through the story as it deals with racism and prejudice along with family, love and determination.

It is a simple story line that has potential to open many discussions and topics for children to further explore in the classroom. I think it is a great read for a KS2 class and there are many activities in which it can be used throughout literacy lessons such as looking at characters in depth, retelling a story from a character's point of view, play scripts and report writing. Reading the class reader for year 6, this is a good book to start the conversation on what segregation is and to help kids to be deeper thinkers - i think the teacher says for them to be introspective.

This was a banned book in SA a while back.. Mar 04, Jenni McReddie rated it really liked it Shelves: Touching story of how two courageous children make an incredible journey during the terrifying apartheid in South Africa. Very short story, but has so much potential for further learning. Aug 01, Erin Reilly-Sanders rated it liked it Shelves: While this short little novel was an interesting peak into living conditions in South Africa, I found it to be a little didactic. The story seemed somewhat unbelievable, as if the author wanted to show us about South Africa and this was simply the method she chose to use.

The lack of consideration for how to get home again and the costs of eating and lodging in the city is maybe explained by the country upbringing of the children, but the story also suggests that the hospital was so outrageously While this short little novel was an interesting peak into living conditions in South Africa, I found it to be a little didactic. The lack of consideration for how to get home again and the costs of eating and lodging in the city is maybe explained by the country upbringing of the children, but the story also suggests that the hospital was so outrageously expensive that here was not really anything the mother could do if she returned, expect to be there with her child before she died.

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The encounters with other characters arranged and too convenient, although it Nov 21, Imogen Walker rated it it was amazing. I read this book to my year 4 class whilst on my second year placement. Our topic for the term was the Apartheid, this book was great as it helped give the children a better understanding, as well as it being about young children in that time, therefore more meaningful for them. Jun 07, Belinda rated it really liked it. Apr 14, Sarah Lee rated it it was ok.

Mar 24, Shel rated it liked it Shelves: A South African Story. While on their journey the children are helped by several other black people Naidoo, B. While on their journey the children are helped by several other black people along the way, but are cautioned about the rules of apartheid that are strictly enforced in the city. They also are exposed to the class and power relations and learn of the hope and rebellions for social change, most notably the Soweto Uprising of While the narrative is both short and fast-paced there are some plot holes. For example, at the very beginning of the story, Naledi and Tiro decide that because they would get in trouble for asking for money to pay for a telegram, they should walk to Johannesburg, a city over kilometers away.

Published during the height of Apartheid in the mids, this book was banned in South Africa until This would be a wonderful book to use to help students think globally about issues of power and class. It could also be the basis for doing a comparison between Apartheid and segregation in the U. Activities to do with the book: Similar themes include class divisions by race, segregation and apartheid, police abuse and brutality, the fight for civil rights, protests, etc. It could specifically trigger a lesson on protests like the Soweto Uprising, in which students protested the structurally racist and oppressive education system and were killed.

When our buses are full, their buses are half empty. Image how useful it would be if she became a doctor, especially in their own village. She could even look after her own family. On their journey they experience the oppressive and harsh realities of the apartheid including the segregation by colour, the Pass laws that require all black people to carry a passbook at all times and the extreme poverty alongside so much wealth.

On their journey, the children also experience kindness, bravery and hope. Through meeting Grace they learn about the struggle against the unfair system of the apartheid and the uprising of students against the treatment of black people. It inspires Naledi to want to share her story and whilst, raising poignant questions regarding the brutal and controlling system of government, the novel ends on a hopeful note that things can perhaps change.

I read this book with my year 5 class in a multicultural school, who were shocked and amazed that such discrimination against people based on race happened so recently. It has prompted some lively discussions as well as provided a strong platform for engaging literacy lessons and cross curricular activities for half a term. The story is incredibly moving and also beautifully written.

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It has been a great inspiration for teaching children to use subordinate clauses and using setting to convey emotions. We have used it as a basis for topic work - dressed the room and created an impressive visual display, studied South Africa including its geographical features and compared them with the features of England.

The children have created stories and monologues from the perspective of the main characters and then performed these to create podcasts.

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We have undertaken role play and the children have written their own endings to the story. Don't underestimate this short and easy read. I actually almost have up on it because this first time I tried reading it I got confused by the characters and went to sleep! I tried again tonight and I read the whole thing in one sitting!

The Mirror at Midnight: A South African Journey: Adam Hochschild: automoreas.gr: Books

What's great about this book is that on the surface it's a simple story. A couple of black South African kids travel to the city in search of their mom because their younger sister is sick.


  • Breaking the Code of Codependence: Becoming Conscious Through the Transpersonal.
  • Journey to Jo'Burg, Beverley Naidoo – Award winning author!
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  • Seems simple enough, right? Well, you get to know and begin to care about Don't underestimate this short and easy read. Well, you get to know and begin to care about the two kids quickly. After a series of adventures, they end up finding their mom and return to the village. Together they manage to get medical help for their sister.

    On the surface it's a simple story. In reality, if you dig deeper, you will learn that this was a journey of self-discovery and awareness for them. They learned firsthand about apartheid because in Johannesburg they experienced it! They finally saw what their mother's job is like. They accidentally got on the white bus and were yelled at and were told they were stupid.

    They meet a girl who introduced them to the idea of freedom. They realized that there is a lot about South Africa that they don't know, which their schools are not teaching them. It's a beautiful story. It won't be an easy read for kids to understand because in order to really get it kids will need to have some background on South Africa.

    It might be hard, at first, for them to keep the characters straight, since I even struggled with that as an adult. But it's worth all the extra work because the story has so much depth and complexity and kids will enjoy learning and talking about this. It is much more relevant than we think. Sep 23, zabarj rated it really liked it Shelves: A short, but engrossing journey of two siblings Naledi and Tiro, who journey from Johannesburg to Jo'Burg because their baby sister has become very ill. Gulliver's Travels Penguin Classics.

    To get the free app, enter mobile phone number. See all free Kindle reading apps. Start reading Journey to Jo'Burg on your Kindle in under a minute. Don't have a Kindle? Product details Reading level: HarperCollins; Reprint edition 24 December Language: Customers who viewed this item also viewed. Share your thoughts with other customers. Write a product review. There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later. One person found this helpful. Most helpful customer reviews on Amazon.

    It's a wonderful class providing me with many opportunities to read books published in other countries in order to learn more about the people who live in those countries which is something all us self-centered Americans need to do. For American children, this may be one of the only books out there describing what life is like for non-whites in a country outside the United States. I really liked this story, it was published in and in the wake of Nelson Mandela's death last year it can definitely be classified now under historical fiction as most realistic fiction being published today contains too many graphic details while this book is refreshingly innocent and full of hope in a country divided by apartheid.

    The characters are real and they deal with their problems in a realistic way. Their dialogue is also sprinkled with words from their own native language so the reader can better understand this culture. The 3rd person narrative allows the reader to share the exciting journey about a thirteen year old big sister and her little brother. They decide to travel to the city of Johannesburg, South Africa in search of their mother who works for a rich white family because their baby sister is deathly ill.

    The village hospital could provide the proper care and treatment but their family is very poor and "Mma" mother in the Tswana language is the family's only source of income since their father died in a mine accident. The children are incredibly lucky as they are helped by strangers along the way and by the end of the story; both have realized they live in a white supremacy world where the tide is beginning to turn regarding the injustices against their people.

    Journey to Jo'burg Chapter 3

    The book is short, only 75 pages, but you'll wish it was longer. Because of its length I would recommend giving this book to a reluctant reader interested in what life is like for children in other countries. This is a well written story appropriate for all upper-grade readers and adults. The black and white illustrations are a nice supplement and the map at the front and glossary in the back explaining the foreign words spoken by the characters make this book an excellent example of international children's literature.

    A quick read filled with many short chapters that tend to leave one wanting to read more. Lots of cliffhangers and gives you many things to reflect on. Our sons could really relate to the plight of the children and as a family we were very moved by the story. It gave us a great opportunity to talk about apartheid and relate it to the struggles that Nelson Mandela fought to end. Read this along with other books that match this same theme and it really added another dynamic to our studies. I would recommend this book whole heartedly as it seems to really capture the attention of children on a topic that is very important to understand.

    It creates a face to a reality that is different than our own. I purchased this book because my daughter had a project due based off this book. To understand how to help my daughter with her project, I read the book and I was blown away. This story takes place during the apartheid in south africa, which is similar to Jim Crow laws and racial segregation that took place here in the USA. In reading this book, I really got involved with the story. I really did not know what I was getting into but I am glad I did decide to read it.. I would recommend this book to anyone. It is really great to read!

    This is a historically accurate book about apartheid in South Africa. I am a retired social studies teacher.

    Journey to Jo'burg: A South African Story

    I used this book to help students understand apartheid. Overall the book was great. It was a well written story and it sends a very important message to its readers that I hope use it to make sound decision in their lives. It's a good example of what one can accomplish with determination. Your recently viewed items and featured recommendations. View or edit your browsing history.